Children of the convict women


Son of Margaret Hughes

Daniel travelled to NSW on the Friends with his mother and his two (possibly half) sisters. He was the only one to take the name of Thomas Banks, the partner and later husband of his mother, who was also transported.

See Margaret Hughes See Caroline Hughes See Charlotte Hughes

1809 – Approximate birth date in London

1814 – as Dennis Hughes in VDL muster

1837 – 14 July, aged 28, 5 feet 7 ½ “, dark complexion, black hair, hazel eyes, sawyer and splitter, born London, single, no children, Roman Catholic, cannot read or write
Charged and convicted at Hobart Supreme Court of feloniously receiving stolen mutton worth 10 shillings and sentenced to 14 years, the first five to be spent at the Port Arthur penal settlement

1838 – 3 March, idling the whole of the day, 10 days No. 3 chain gang, Port Arthur

1839 – 10 May, having in his possession a quantity of hemp panellings contrary to orders, (punishment hard to decipher) Port Arthur

1839 – 13 June, absent from his place of work, 25 lashes, Port Arthur

1841 – 6 April, bread, tobacco and pipe in possession, 14 days’ solitary, Port Arthur

1843 – 17 March, drunk, two hours in the stocks

1844 – 12 January, ToL

1845 – 23 December, recommended for a conditional pardon

1846 – Married Sarah Danech in Brighton, Tasmania

1852 – 13 February, Certificate of Freedom

1873 – 6 April, obtaining goods by false pretences, 10 days in Hobart Gaol

According to family history sites, Daniel died in Newtown. In 1838, his colonial-born brother Anthony was sentenced to hang as a bushranger.

Sources:
Conduct register CON 35-1-1,p. 45; 16/1/1, p. 54, Archives Office of Tasmania
“Supreme Court,” Hobart Town Courier, 28 July 1837, p. 3
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Marianne Bellars, daughter of Amelia Bellars

Mary Ann was imprisoned as an eight-year old with her convicted mother Amelia in Newgate Gaol while awaiting a transport ship to New South Wales. Mary Ann travelled with her on the Friends at the age of about nine. See Amelia Bellars

1826 – 12 September, Mary Ann Bellairs m. Capt. Robert Stewart Walker at Scots Church, Sydney.

Mary Ann had been at sea with her Captain for several years and borne him two of their seven children before they married in Sydney. Robert was 49 and Mary Ann was about 19 when their first child Eleanor was born at sea in 1822 near Millenna, in the East Indies. Mary Ann was born in Tahiti in 1824. Their remaining children were all born after their marriage in Sydney. Robert was born in 1826, 16 days after his parents married; John was born in 1829, Helen in 1830, David in 1832, and Agnes in 1842.

Source:
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Daughter of Mary Wilmot

In NSW, Mary Wilmot married Daniel Brown of Windsor. The premise that Elizabeth is the daughter of Mary is based on the 1825 muster where she is shown separately to Mary’s other children with Daniel, and as “came free”. Elizabeth’s age in the 1828 muster suggests she was born c. 1810 though she was recorded as “born colony”. See Mary Wilmot

Family history sites suggest Elizabeth’s father was William Wilmot and that she was born in May 1811 in Hertfordshire but this was not possible given that the Friends left England in early April 1811 and her mother had been imprisoned since May 1810.  Instead, it’s possible her father was George Wilmot.

1825 – Elizabeth Brown, came free, daughter of Daniel Brown, Windsor M

1826 – 6 April, Elizabeth m. John Byrne, Windsor

1828 – Elizabeth, aged 18, born colony, John aged 23, born colony, farmer, Cornwallis, Children: James, aged 2, John Jun aged 1 CEN

According to a family history site Elizabeth and John’s children were: James born 1826, John born 1828, Thomas, born 1830, Mary Catherine born 1833 and William Francis born 1839; all born Cornwallis.

Source:
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Elizabeth Brown

Henry was born on the voyage of the Friends to NSW on 1 August 1811. There’s a possibility that William Hants, from whom his mother Elizabeth stole some clothes and a watch, fathered her child before he discovered he had been robbed. See Elizabeth Brown

1819 – 1 January, admitted to Male Orphan School in Sydney, aged 8, mother Elizabeth Brown, a servant at Kerry Lodge, Nepean CS

1822 – Henry Browne, came free, aged 12, Male Orphan School M

1825 – Came free, 1811, Orphan School, Liverpool (the school was relocated there from Sydney) M

1826 – 29 September, Discharged from Orphan School (to) Major Druitt CS

Henry was 15 when he left the Orphan School. Major George Druitt had retired from the army and worked as the colony’s engineer before resigning in 1821. Druitt was granted 2000 acres by Governor Macquarie around the area now known as Blacktown, NSW.

Sources:
CS: Admitted to male orphan school in January 1819, NRS 898 4/7208; also NSWSR NRS 796 [1]; Reel 2777; 1477, p. 1 (record includes birthdate)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Mary Browning

Mary Browning gave birth to her oldest child Elizabeth in Tralee in 1805 and she travelled with her on the Friends. The possibility that Mary’s son Edward also travelled on the Friends is supported only by the 1822 NSW muster where Edward Browning is shown “of the Friends” and is listed in addition to three other (unnamed) children of Mary’s.  It is possible there was also another son William on the Friends. See Mary Browning See Elizabeth Browning See William Browning

1822 – Edward Browning, came free, Windsor M

1825 – Mary Browning lives with Mick O’Connor, Richmond, children of Mary Browning: Edward 11, Mary 9, David 7, all BC M

As seen above, the information between the two musters is conflicting. In the later muster, Edward is shown as being born in NSW c. 1814. The 1814 muster showed Mary with two children – no details were provided for children in that muster. There appear to be no baptism records or birth registrations for any of the Goodwin children. Family history sites use the 1814 birthdate and cite the death of a man in Windsor named Edward Goodwin in 1894, aged 79 years old, as the source.  The death certificate for that Edward Goodwin shows his parents were Edward Goodwin and Mary (surname not known), that he was Catholic (like Mary Browning)  and that he was born in Freeman’s Reach, which is near Windsor in the Hawkesbury district and was also the place where Mary Browning died.

Source:
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Daughter of Mary Browning

Elizabeth was born in Tralee Ireland c. 1805 according to her death certificate.  It gave her father’s name as James and also recorded her marrying at the age of 15 in 1820, though she actually married at the end of 1819. See Mary Browning See Edward Browning See William Browning

1819 – 27 December, Elizabeth Browning m. James Staples, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1820 – Elizabeth Staples, came free, (with) J. Staples, Windsor M

1822 – Elizabeth Staples, CF, GS, J. Staples, Windsor: Child – daughter of Elizabeth; James Staples, TL, Life, Indefatigable 1815, landholder, Windsor M

1825 – Came free, wife of Jas. Staples, Wilberforce; Daughter Catherine aged 4 M

1828 – aged 22, Catholic, came free, married to James Staples, 33, Pro, TL, Indefatigable 1815, Farmer, Wilberforce; Children: Catherine 7, Ann 3. Elizabeth’s 10-year old brother David also lived with them. CEN

1864 28 January, Elizabeth died, aged 59, of rheumatism and exhaustion of old age, buried 30 January Roman Catholic Cemetery, Windsor.

At Elizabeth’s death there were 5 children living : Catherine (42), Ann (36), Emma (33), Elizabeth (31) and James (28) and one male child and one female child dead.

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1819, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898. Reel 6024
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Possible son of Mary Browning

William Browning who “came free” on the Friends appears in two NSW musters. No other information has been found about him. His connection to Mary is through his surname and location. See Mary Browning See Edward Browning See Elizabeth Browning

1822 – came free, Wilberforce M

1825 – came free, labourer, Wilberforce M

This person should not be confused with another William Browning, of the Friendship 1788, who also appears in the musters.

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Mary French

It is probable, but not confirmed, that John accompanied his mother Mary on the Friends.  See Mary French

1806 – approximate birth date in London

1813 – VDL (name recorded as James) BDA

1832 –  15 November, John William, aged 26, of Collins Street, Hobart, was buried

No firm record has been found of John in NSW or Tasmania before his death. There are a number of newspaper references to John French who was a seaman, but there was also a seafaring convict of the same name. His father William, who joined Mary in the colony, made a will in 1832 that referred to his son, “now” of Hobart Town, suggesting John previously had been living somewhere else. John was buried on the same day as his father William, who died of illness, and both men lived at the same address.

While it is likely John’s name was incorrectly recorded in the 1813 muster, it is also possible Mary and William had another child named James who perhaps died. However, John was not otherwise recorded in the 1813 muster.

Sources:

Will of William French

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Rebecca Golsby

William was three years old when he accompanied his mother Rebecca Golsby on the Friends. See Rebecca Golsby

1808 – 12 May, William born to John Golsby and Rebecca Dear, London

1827 – Married Elizabeth Jenkins, St James, Sydney

1889 – 11 May, William died, one day short of his 81st birthday, at the home of his son Edward in Rockley, NSW. He and his wife are buried at Caloola Cemetery in Bathurst.

William and Elizabeth had 11 children:  Elizabeth, b. 1829; William, b. 1831; Sarah, b. 1833; Joseph, born 1835; Thomas Charles, born 1837; Edward, born 1840; William Jenkins, b. 1842; Rebecca, b. 1844; Myra Virginia, b. 1847; Frances Jane, b. 1850; and Jessie Australia, b. 1853.

William, who initially worked as a carpenter, received a government grant of 90-acre Grantham Farm in Bathhurst effective from 1 January 1839 and farmed the property for 26 years. Ten of his 11 children were born there. The family then moved to 50-acre Elizabeth Farm at the foot of what is today Mt Panorama. William was a successful farmer and eventually acquired a total of 2000 acres of landholdings. In the 1880s William and Elizabeth retired to their 175-acre farm at Bringelong. (Kevin Golsby)

When he died, William was described as one of the oldest residents of the Bathurst district. Elizabeth predeceased him in March 1889.

William and his mother Rebecca are featured in a fictionalised account of Rebecca’s life with Joseph Tuso written by her descendant Kevin Golsby. The book uses the framework of known facts:  Once More to be Free

Sources:
Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, 14 May 1889, p. 2
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Jane Carberry and John Gregory

John was a baby when he accompanied his mother Jane Carberry on the Friends. He was born in gaol in Lichfield just four days after Jane had been convicted of high treason alongside his Canadian father John Gregory. Gregory was transported to NSW on the Indian in 1810. See Jane Carberry

1810 – 14 October, baptised as John Carbray, St Mary’s, Lichfield

1837 – 27 July, married Ann Briscoe, Ricmond district, VDL

1841 – 15 August, daughter Sarah born, baptised on 3 January 1842, Richmond; John, labourer of Jerusalem

1844 – 12 August, daughter Jane Louisa born, baptised 31 October, Richmond; John, labourer of Jerusalem

1849 – 3 May, son John born, christened 27 May, Richmond; John, farmer, Colbrook Dale area

1851 – Census, residence shown at Flat Top Hill

1851 – 10 October, son John William born, baptised 16 November; John, farmer, Colebrook Dale area

1856 – On list of persons entitled to be placed on Electoral Roll for Jordan; Freehold estate “Greenfield”

1866 – On Electoral Roll for Oatlands, freeholder of his property – Greenfield” in Jerusalem

1885 – 26 December, John died in Richmond, farmer aged 77, cause of death – chronic cystitis

Parents Jane Carberry and John Gregory were together initially in NSW and had a second child Eleanor. However, in 1816 Gregory was sent from Sydney on the Kangaroo to Van Diemen’s Land, where he worked as a clerk in the Commissary’s Office in Hobart. At some point, John and Eleanor went to live with their father in Hobart. In 1823 Gregory’s brother, an officer in the 19th Light Dragoons, wrote from an address in Edinburgh, Scotland, to the Colonial Secretary of NSW, trying to establish if Gregory was still living. This prompted Gregory to write a letter recording some of his history, which is in the CS files. He stated he had two motherless children aged 14 and 11 with him.

John and his sister are said to have lived with Thomas Fowles at his property at Clarence Plains. At the time of his marriage to Ann Briscoe, John lived in the Colebrook Vale area.

At his death, John was described in the Launceston Examiner, 2 January 1886, as “an old and much respected colonist…He has been a resident of Jerusalem for nearly 50 years and a hard-working steady man”. The Mercury, 30 December 1885, wrote in its obituary: “The deceased was well known, honoured and loved by hundreds, and by his genial disposition and many good qualities was a great favourite. His funeral on Tuesday, the 29th inst., gave ample proof of the respect and esteem in which he was held. From far and near came mourners to that sad procession, which was the largest that has ever yet taken place here….Mr John Gregory, who was a good husband, a kind father and a true friend.”

John’s wife Ann remained on their farm and died nearly five years later. In 1894, Jerusalem was officially renamed Colebrook.

Sources:
www.ancestry.com.au
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Ann Ryley

The presence of Thomas Gwilliam on the voyage is not confirmed and details about him are scant. Ann Ryley was pregnant at her trial in June 1810 and would have given birth before the voyage. In NSW she married William Gwilliam. Conflicting information is provided for Thomas and his brother William in the censuses. One of the two was colonial-born. See Ann Ryley

1822 – Thomas Gillam, came free; William Jun. Gillam, aged 13, born colony, children of William Gillam M

1824 – William Gwilliam, a free born boy aged 13 years, seeks permission to accompany his father William to Port Macquarie penal settlement CS

1825 – Thomas Gwillam, aged 15, born colony, employed by J Ablett, Evan; William Gwillam, aged 16, son of William Gwillam M

William Gwilliam senior, who worked as a blacksmith, was sentenced to two years’ transportation in 1823 for the theft of 200 Spanish dollars. The fact that only his son William sought to accompany him in exile suggests that Thomas was indeed the older brother. The 1822 muster, however, remains the only record that Thomas arrived in NSW with Ann. No further information about him can be found.

Sources:
CS: 9 August 1824, NRS 897, 6069 4/1817, p. 56
State Archives Court of Criminal Jurisdiction Reel 1980, 2703 SZ802, p. 73 NSWSR

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Mother unknown

It is not known who this was. William Howard was shown as “came free” on the Friends in two NSW musters and in a population book. He cannot be located in the 1828 Census.

1806 – Approximate birth year

1822 – aged 16, apprentice to Spencer ?, Wilberforce(Population Book)

1822 – Apprentice Windsor M

1825 – Apprentice Windsor M

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Daughter of Elizabeth Hughes

Family websites suggest that sisters Caroline and Charlotte were fathered by a man named Hughes, before their mother Elizabeth met Thomas Banks with whom she was convicted. Both girls used the Hughes name. Their younger brother Daniel, who also travelled on the Friends, used the surname Banks. See Margaret Hughes See Charlotte Hughes See Daniel Banks

1808 – Approximate birth date in London

1814 – Caroline Hughes M

1844 – Caroline Hughes m. John Constable, Tasmania

Sources:
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Daughter of Elizabeth Hughes

Family websites suggest that sisters Charlotte and Caroline were fathered by a man named Hughes, before their mother Elizabeth met Thomas Banks with whom she was convicted. Both girls used the Hughes name. Their younger brother Daniel, who also travelled on the Friends, used the surname Banks. See Margaret Hughes See Caroline Hughes See Daniel Banks

1806 – Approximate birth date in London

1814 – Charlotte Hughes M

1850 – Charlotte Hughes m. William Etheridge, Tasmania

Sources:
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Mary Jones

Charles was one year old when he travelled with his mother Mary and older brother John on the Friends. See Mary Jones See John Jones

1810 – born 11 January, London CS

1810 – 31 October, in his mother’s arms when she is convicted at Old Bailey, London

1819 – I January, admitted with older brother John to Male Orphan School, Sydney CS

1822 – Aged 13, Male Orphan School, Sydney M

1822 – 22 November, Mary Day’s petition to have her boys removed from Male Orphan School rejected, CS

1826 – 13 December, Mary Day requests Charles Jones be returned to her custody. States: Charles Jones has been employed for some time in the capacity of a tailor. Asks for him to be assigned to her as she knows a respectable man who is willing to offer him an apprenticeship. CS

1828 – 19 July, quit school, apprenticed to Joseph Booth, tailor, Parramatta CS

1828 – Age 17, CF, Friendship 1813, “taylor”, resides with Joseph Booth CEN

Possible marriage: Charles Jones m. Mary A Boswell, St Johns Parramatta, 1833

Sources:
CS: Male Orphan School, NRS 796 [1]; Reel 2777; 1477, p. 2; NRS 898 4/7208; Petition, 22 November 1822, Reel 6040, 4/400 p. 50; Petition, 13 Dec 1826, NRS 783 (1), Reel 2776, pp 157-8
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Mary Jones, also known as John Day

John was two years old when he travelled with his mother Mary and younger brother Charles on the Friends. See Mary Jones See Charles Jones

1808 – born 13 September, London CS

1819 – 1 January, admitted with younger brother Charles to Male Orphan School, Sydney CS

1822 – 22 November, Mary Day’s petition to have her boys removed from Male Orphan School rejected, CS

1822 – 4 December, quit school, aged 14, apprenticed to E.G. Hazard, pump and block maker, Sydney CS

1825 – John Jones, CF, son of Mary Day, Parramatta M

1828 – John Day, aged 21, Windsor CEN

Sources:
CS: Male Orphan School, NRS 796 [1]; Reel 2777; 1477, p. 2; NRS 898 4/7208; Petition, 22 November 1822, Reel 6040, 4/400 p. 50

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Mother unknown

It is not known who this was. William Marwood was shown as “came free” on the Friends in one muster and in the 1828 Census.

1806 – approximate birth year

1825 – Labourer, Richmond

1828 – Aged 22, Protestant, labourer for S. Gearside, Richmond

Tasmanian records show a William Marwood marrying Sarah Wilks in Launceston on 17 January 1835. This man died of dropsey, aged 66, on 20 September 1873 (age shown incorrectly in record as 60). He was a carpenter.

Sources:
Tasmanian State Archives

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Daughter of Mary Taylor

Sarah travelled on the Friends with her mother Mary Taylor. Sarah is shown in the musters with the surname of her mother’s second colonial husband, George, whom she married in 1818 when Sarah was about nine years old. Sarah’s father was John Taylor. See Mary Taylor

1809 – Approx. birth date M

1824 – Sarah Hambridge, came free, born 1809 M

1825 – Sarah Hambridge, 16, shown as born colony M

Several family history sites suggest that Sarah married under the name Taylor on 16 October 1826, in Liverpool, NSW. The groom was a convict named Robert Garrard/Garrad (Garrett in NSWBDM) who became a prosperous land owner. The couple went on to have 10 children. Given that no other marriage or death can be found for Sarah, this may be correct and is supported by the details in her death record. This Sarah died in December 1864 in Ulladulla. In the NSWBDM records where her surname is given as Garrad, her parent’s names are recorded as John and Mary.

Sources:
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)
Family history site (3)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Ann Alsop, daughter of Elizabeth Smith,

Ann’s mother claimed to be originally from Somersetshire but was convicted of theft at London’s Old Bailey. She told the court she has only been in London for five weeks. See Elizabeth Smith

1807 – Approx. birthdate

1823 – 2 June, Ann Treble m. Thomas Warwick, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1824 – 14 March, son John born

1825 – Ann Warwick, came free, wife of Thos Warwick, Parramatta M

1828 – Ann Alsop aged, aged 21, came free, Field of Mars, married to Francis Alsop, aged 30, ToL, Elizabeth, 1816, life, Protestant, labourer , Field of May; Children: John aged 5, Francis jun aged 3, James aged 1 CEN

Two more children fathered by Francis: Joseph born 1830 and William born 1832

1839 – 4 March, Anne married Edward Billett at St Johns Parramatta. One of the witnesses was her stepfather John Eyles

Children: Edward born 1835, Sarah born 1837, Mary Ann born 1840, Ann Elizabeth born 1843, Susan born 1844, Elizabeth born 1847

1853 – 19 August, Ann died, Parramatta

An infant named Ann Treble was baptised on 6 July 1807 at St James in Piccadilly, London, to parents Samuel and Elizabeth. However, Ann’s mother Elizabeth had told the court when she was convicted that she was newly arrived in London from Somersetshire, which may or may not have been true.

Ann’s first husband Thomas Warwick was a convict serving a life sentence, who arrived on the Malaber in 1819. He worked as a sawyer and was issued a ticket of leave at the end of 1827. By that time Ann had been with Francis Alsop for several years. No death record for Warwick has been found and the indents show only the issue of the ticket of leave i.e. no pardons. It is possible he left the colony.

Ann’s first child with Francis Alsop, also named Francis, was born on 15 December 1825. Ann does not appear to have married Francis Alsop, to whom she had five children. Alsop was originally a sailor from Liverpool who became a tenant farmer in NSW. According to a family history website, he later married in England in 1853 and had two more children there who died shortly after birth . Francis died in Australia in 1861.

Ann’s last child with Alsop was born on 29 October 1832. Less than six months later, she was applying to marry Edward Billett, also a convict who arrived on the Sesostris in 1826. He had been sentenced to transportation for life at the Wiltshire Assizes. Despite permission being granted they did not marry until six years later. She had 6 children to Edward Billett. Edward had a ticket of leave issued in June 1836 but it was rescinded when he was convicted in Parramatta of allowing spirits to be sold in his house in 1840 and he was given a six-month sentence. It was likely the same offence that got Ann sent to Newcastle, from where she was discharged in April 1840. Then in July 1841, she was in Parramatta Gaol for three calendar months in July 1841, again for breach of licencing (laws). It was either that or pay a fine of £30 11 shillings. In April 1842 she was again sent to Newcastle. GD

Edward was issued a second ticket of leave in April 1842 and he was pardoned by the end of 1845. After Ann died, a family history site states that Edward Billett remarried and had 10 more children. He died in 1874.

Sources:
CS: 5 May 1823 Ann Treble and Thomas Warwick, Re permission to marry at Parramatta, NRS 9374/3508 p. 244; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1823, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6025
Tickets of leave: (Thomas Warwick) NRS 12202 4/4066 Reel 910, No. 27/954 issued 29 December 1827; (Edward Billett) NRS 12202 4/4105 reel 925, No. 36/1090 issued 3 June 1836; NRS 12202 4/4162 reel 944, No. 42/1024 issued 19 April 1842 NSWSR
Register of convicts’ application to marry: 8 May 1833, Ann Tribbles to marry Edward Billett, allowed 9 December 1837, Ann Warwick to marry Edward Billett allowed www.ancestry.com.au
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Son of Mary Wilson

William travelled with his mother on the Friends and was briefly abandoned by her in the Factory when she absconded in 1812. He was described as an infant at that time. See Mary Wilson.

1825 – William Wilson, came free, living with mother at J. McGuire’s, Richmond M

No further information has been found about William.

There were two William Wilsons in the 1828 Census shown without vessels and both were shown (not necessarily correctly) as “born colony”:

Aged 19, apprentice, Castlereagh Street, Sydney

Aged 18, wheelwright, George Graham, Lower Hunter